Me: Inside Out

On the journey of my life. Praying my way through, and living the best way I know how. Loving you. Loving my team. Most importantly, Loving Me :)

I watch you channel your
pain into art, into poetry,
into music, into prayer.

It baffles me how you
embrace life with so much
agony and refuse to ask
for anything in return
except the precious
privilege of expression.

weloveshortvideos:

Vine by Kenzie Nimmo

poeticartillery:

I’m learning that love isn’t all rainbows and kisses. There’s a whole lot of rain clouds and umbrellas involved.

It’s easy to fall in love but there’s a heightened level of difficulty when it comes to staying in love.

The fairy tales don’t tell you that.

What makes us right with God isn’t what we do or don’t do, nor is it what we say or don’t say. What makes us right with God is our faith in what Jesus accomplished for us on the cross as a Man fully submitted to the Father. We’re called to live and walk by faith in Him, not in ourselves.

—(via sonofhislove)

blackfashion:

Kristine of TrendyCurvy.com, Los Angeles
Photographer: Steve Suavemente

blackfashion:

Kristine of TrendyCurvy.com, Los Angeles

Photographer: Steve Suavemente

The idea is to write it so that people hear it and it slides through the brain and goes straight to the heart.

—Maya Angelou (via writingbox)

(via quiltedsails)

I wanted to be a writer, that’s all. I wanted to write about it all. Everything that happens in a moment. The way the flowers looked when you carried them in your arms. This towel, how it smells, how it feels. This thread. All our feelings, yours and mine. The history of it, who we once were. Everything in the world. Everything all mixed up, like it’s all mixed up now.

—Michael Cunningham, The Hours (via poetrist)

I wanted to be a writer, that’s all. I wanted to write about it all. Everything that happens in a moment. The way the flowers looked when you carried them in your arms. This towel, how it smells, how it feels. This thread. All our feelings, yours and mine. The history of it, who we once were. Everything in the world. Everything all mixed up, like it’s all mixed up now.

—Michael Cunningham, The Hours (via poetrist)

(via poemsofthequiet)

blackmanteach:

Bryan Butcher Jr.
“I teach to liberate the minds of tomorrow. Growing up, I was blessed to have a variety of role models. My family, friends, and athletic coaches all instilled in me the values of responsibility, respect, and humility. My role models also stressed the importance of my education. They taught me that as a Black man, education is the key to my success in this world. 
While in one of my first courses at Morehouse College, I received my first failing paper. I went into my professor’s office seeking answers about that single assignment, and came out with a different mindset about my entire education. Dr. Mukenge told me my paper was written from the standpoint of what she wanted to hear, rather than what I believed. My ideas, my thoughts, and my perspectives were important and valid, and she encouraged me to use them. That day I learned my education was not solely a prerequisite for my career, but it was meant to liberate my mind. I owned my education.
Every day I walk into my classroom with the mission to teach my children to love learning. Love geometry because those same shapes and angles you explore will be the base of the historical monument you build one day. Love reading with expression because the voice you use may be the voice you channel during your Julliard acting auditions. Love social studies because those historical figures may possess the values you use to change the world. I’ve found that when you love what you’re doing, you don’t mind working a little bit harder. I hope for my students that I, Mr. Butcher, the Black man in front of them each day, am able to not only provide them with the academic skills to be successful, but also liberate their minds to become transformational citizens in the world.”

blackmanteach:

Bryan Butcher Jr.

“I teach to liberate the minds of tomorrow. Growing up, I was blessed to have a variety of role models. My family, friends, and athletic coaches all instilled in me the values of responsibility, respect, and humility. My role models also stressed the importance of my education. They taught me that as a Black man, education is the key to my success in this world. 

While in one of my first courses at Morehouse College, I received my first failing paper. I went into my professor’s office seeking answers about that single assignment, and came out with a different mindset about my entire education. Dr. Mukenge told me my paper was written from the standpoint of what she wanted to hear, rather than what I believed. My ideas, my thoughts, and my perspectives were important and valid, and she encouraged me to use them. That day I learned my education was not solely a prerequisite for my career, but it was meant to liberate my mind. I owned my education.

Every day I walk into my classroom with the mission to teach my children to love learning. Love geometry because those same shapes and angles you explore will be the base of the historical monument you build one day. Love reading with expression because the voice you use may be the voice you channel during your Julliard acting auditions. Love social studies because those historical figures may possess the values you use to change the world. I’ve found that when you love what you’re doing, you don’t mind working a little bit harder. I hope for my students that I, Mr. Butcher, the Black man in front of them each day, am able to not only provide them with the academic skills to be successful, but also liberate their minds to become transformational citizens in the world.”

(via mrajosiah)